The Colonial British government has expressed regret over treatment meted out on British residents who arrived from the Caribbean decades ago and are now being denied basic rights.

The ‘‘Windrush generation’‘ of migrants and have been denied access to basic services like health care and work permit, after being incorrectly identified as illegal immigrants.

“I recognise the concern from some people in the Windrush generation and I wouldn’t want anyone who has made their life in the UK to feel unwelcome or be in any doubt of their right to remain here. As my right honourable friend the prime minister has already made clear, there is absolutely no question about their right to remain and I am very sorry for any confusion or anxiety felt”, said Britain Interior Miniser, Amber Rudd.

The vast majority will already have documentation that proves their right to be here. But for those that don’t, I’m today announcing a new dedicated team that was set up to help these people evidence their right to be in this country and access services.

The ‘Windrush generation’ of migrants arrived in Britain more than 50 years ago and have become victims of a recent tightening of the immigration system.

More than 140 lawmakers have signed a letter calling on Prime Minister, Theresa May to resolve an anomaly for those who immigrated as children between 1948 and 1971.

Amber Rudd noted that ‘‘the vast majority will already have documentation that proves their right to be here. But for those that don’t, I’m today announcing a new dedicated team that was set up to help these people evidence their right to be in this country and access services”.

Rudd added that fees will be waived for those applying for new documents.

The immigrants are named after the Empire Windrush, one of the first ships to bring Caribbean migrants to Britain in 1948.This was when Commonwealth citizens were invited to fill labour shortages and help rebuild the economy after World War Two.

According to Britain’s National Archives, almost half a million people left their homes in the West Indies to live in Britain between 1948 and 1970.

Reuters

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